Pregnancy, Prematurity and Pumping

First up — I was invited to do a guest post on the “Breastfeeding with Comfort and Joy” blog on my experience with pumping breastmilk for someone else’s baby. The post was inspired by this video, entitled “Prescription Milk,” which focuses primarily on the importance of babies — particularly premature babies — getting human milk for their nutrition.

It was so touching that the mother featured in the trailer chose to celebrate and memorialize her daughter’s brief life, by continuing to pump milk even after her own baby died, so that other babies might live.

My personal experience was that I had over-supply issues, so being able to pump extra was a blessing, instead of having to try to minimize my production. Some mothers may not be able to pump enough milk to feed their babies, but there isn’t enough donated milk to supply all the babies who need it. If you are currently pregnant or breastfeeding, or know someone who is, please look into becoming a milk donor through the Human Milk Banking Association of North America, your local hospital, some other organization, or (like I did) just giving a friend bottles or bags of milk. You have to be screened to make sure you aren’t carrying any diseases that may be transmissible through breastmilk, so get started on the process as soon as you can.

Pregnancy is the perfect time to start preparing yourself for breastfeeding. The best way to do that is to talk to women who have successfully breastfed, and watch women breastfeed. I emphasize, “successfully breastfed,” because so many women tell horror stories of how awful breastfeeding was, and how they ended up with sore, cracked, even bleeding nipples, or how they “tried to breastfeed, but I never could make enough milk,” or some other unsuccessful breastfeeding experience. You wouldn’t ask a poor man how to become a millionaire; you wouldn’t ask a teenager for tips on a successful marriage; and you definitely wouldn’t ask me for tips on how to run fast or throw a baseball. 😉 You would instead seek out someone who had been successful in whatever it is you were wanting to succeed. Likewise, don’t ask someone who had a horrible time breastfeeding for breastfeeding tips (even if the lactation person she saw at the hospital said she was doing everything right, or she is otherwise sure she did what she was supposed to do). Or if you do, don’t be surprised if you, too, have a horrible time breastfeeding! Instead, seek out those who had an easy time, who were successful, who had no pain, who nursed as long as they wanted to (and/or longer than they expected). If you don’t know anyone that fits that description, or feel awkward asking to watch them as they nurse their babies, don’t despair! There is a book filled with beautiful and intimate breastfeeding images, along with clear and simple text, to help you see what a good latch really looks like and how to achieve that.

Get the book now, while you’re still pregnant, read the text, study the pictures, take it with you to the hospital (or just keep it at your bed-side table if you’re having a home birth), and start breastfeeding off not just correctly but confidently. As World Breastfeeding Week draws to a close, let’s not just celebrate breastfeeding, but help support women as they breastfeed, and remove hindrances that would keep them from success.

~*~

Update — I just noticed that WP has added a “like” feature to posts — that’s cool! 🙂

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