Skin-to-Skin in the O.R. after a C-section

Being born vaginally is good for babies, in part because it colonizes them with the mother’s good bacteria, setting them on the road to health; a C-section bypasses this normal process and may be part of the reason why babies born by Cesarean have higher rates of things like asthma. But putting the baby skin-to-skin with the mom, especially after a Cesarean, can restore some of this good colonization; otherwise, the baby will be colonized only with hospital bacteria. Skin-to-skin contact is also beneficial in facilitating breastfeeding. Typically, when babies are born, they have an innate ability and desire to get to the breast and self-attach; wrapping babies up in a blanket like a burrito prevents this. All too often, whether the baby is born vaginally or by C-section, babies are only briefly shown to the mom right after birth, and then are taken across the room for the newborn assessment and procedures, before finally being returned to their mothers securely swaddled in a hospital blanket. Then, many times, babies are taken to the nursery soon after birth for a bath, then kept in the nursery under the warmer for a few hours to warm back up, and then finally taken back to their mothers… just in time for them to fall asleep for a few hours. But it doesn’t have to be that way. Healthy babies can — and should — be placed skin-to-skin with their mothers immediately after birth, even with a C-section.

Update: Here’s a video showing skin-to-skin after a C-section


If you had a C-section, were you able to have your baby put skin-to-skin in the operating room? Did you even know that was a possibility? If you are a nurse or midwife, do you ever put babies skin-to-skin on their moms, even if they have a C-section?

Weigh in on this topic on the Breastfeeding with Comfort and Joy fan page [currently, it’s the most recent post, dated May 28]. Laura Keegan, the author of Breastfeeding with Comfort and Joy, will be giving Grand Rounds in June/July, so will have the opportunity to talk about this important topic to attending physicians, L&D nurses, and residents in OB, pediatrics, and family practice. She would love to have input from women about their experiences with skin-to-skin contact (or the lack thereof) after both vaginal and Cesarean births, to pass along to the doctors, nurses, and doctors-in-training. What did it mean to you to be able to hold your baby with nothing between you, and just a blanket put over both of you? What did it mean to you to be denied this? Please comment on the fan page post, and also spread the word (blog, share on facebook, Tweet about it, etc.), so that doctors and nurses can find out from you and other women what they otherwise might not hear.

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All My Babies

If you’ve not seen this documentary you need to. From the description:

Both educational tool and poetic portrait of a black midwife and childbirth in the Deep South.

“This beautiful film is the story of “”Miss Mary”” Coley an African-American midwife more than half a century ago in rural Georgia. Conceived as a demonstration film for “”granny”” midwives its production sponsored by the Georgia Department of Public Health All My Babies quickly transcended its initial purpose. It was used around the world by UNESCO and has become an enduring classic of non-fiction film.

All My Babies was written produced and directed by George C. Stoney in close collaboration with Mrs. Coley as well as with local public health doctors and nurses and shows the preparation for and home delivery of healthy babies in both relatively good and bad rural conditions among black families at that time.

The film is in addition both a deeply respectful portrait of “”Miss Mary”” who is revealed as an inspiring human being and a record of the actual living conditions of her patients.

Selected in 2002 by the Librarian of Congress as a “”culturally historically and artistically significant work”” for permanent preservation in the National Film Registry.”

While there were some moments that made me cringe (like Miss Mary telling a mama it wasn’t “safe” to give birth on the floor and that the bed was “much better”; and her fully and completely cleaning and dressing the baby before letting the mama even see the baby), it is still gives great insight to the culture of the time, and it is obvious that the doctor, nurse, and all the midwives had their hearts in the right place, and did the best they could with what they knew at the time.

ISO: Home Birth and/or Midwifery pictures and videos

I’m making several promotional/educational videos about midwives, midwifery, and home birth for our Mississippi Friends of Midwives group, and would like to have more pictures and/or videos that I can use. Here are the two that I’ve gotten done so far.

This second video is clips from my younger son’s newborn exam (we had no video nor pictures from my first home-birth). I edited it for length as well as due to background noise (my mother and sisters talking), so this isn’t the entire exam.

I may even be able to make a lengthier DVD production if I can get enough material. If you have any pictures or video that I can use of midwife-attended births (preferably a home-birth, but I wouldn’t exclude a hospital birth), or even pictures/video of an OB-attended hospital birth to use as a contrast to home birth, or you can video yourself talking about why you chose a home birth, if you’re a midwife why you became a midwife, etc. — if you would like to be included, you can email me the pictures and/or links at kathy_petersen_283 at yahoo dot com [note the spelling of my name!], and in the email please write some sort of statement giving me permission to use the pictures/videos for MS Friends of Midwives.

Thanks!

Man Experiencing Labor

This was cool! Apparently this man thought that men had a higher pain threshold than women, so decided he could take labor. Using electrodes on the abdominal muscles, a doctor and a physiotherapist simulate contractions on him. Of course, with no uterine muscles, it’s not a precise thing… but it’s as close as any man can ever get! They tested the system on a mother of four, and she agreed it was similar to contractions, and then they put it on the man (a doctor). Quite interesting!

During the course of the “labor,” they go from mild, early labor contractions, about every 10 minutes; and as “labor” progresses, they crank it up, both in the strength of the contraction, as well as the duration, along with shortening the time between contractions. Along the way, the OB gives some “coping techniques” for the man to try.

See the outcome for yourself:

h/t to Birth at Home in Arizona

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Cindy Crawford home birth interview

Click here for part 1, and click here for part 2.

You Have a Choice

Click here to go see the video, a short documentary. The thing that I remember most is the nurse at the beginning, talking about the standard assembly-line procedures they do when a woman in labor comes to the hospital. So mechanical; so rote.

Amazing Grace