Kegels don’t do squat?

If there is one mantra, dogma, or axiomatic belief among women “in the know” when it comes to birth and babies, it’s that Kegels are wonderful, necessary, beneficial, etc. Now, someone is challenging that assertion. In short, the way the pelvic floor is understood is wrong, and needs to be changed. Tighter doesn’t necessarily mean better; it just means tighter, which may actually lead to a worsening of the problem. You need to read the whole article, because I’m skipping a lot (or else I’d be tempted to copy and paste most of it, but that wouldn’t be nice), but basically, squatting is what she recommends for incontinence and other things that Kegels are supposed to help.

If she just said that Kegels don’t work, I might be a tad suspicious that rather than being a lone voice of reason, she’s a lone voice for a reason [sorry, couldn’t help the chiasmus there :-)], although I’ve read enough from people who say that most women don’t do them right, and doing them “wrong” is worse than not doing any at all to know that there are many people who share her opinion at least to an extent. However, it was her suggestion of doing squats rather than Kegels which resonated with me.

Squatting is natural; doing Kegels is not, really. For most of human history, women (and men too) had to do a lot of physically demanding work, including a lot of squatting — tending the fire, garden, children, etc. Even in the absence of work, squatting was a natural way to rest and relax, if a chair was not available for whatever reason. Squatting is a normal part of life except for (primarily Western) adults who view squatting as either menial or childish. It’s not really a normal part of life to try to stop and hold the Kegel muscles, is it?

So, I’ll add this to my mental list of reasons to squat more regularly. What do you think of this article?

One Response

  1. I read that blog post about Kegels after Barb posted it on FB. I, too, was skeptical when i saw the title before I read it. I assumed it was just some nutjob who was spouting off a bunch of crapola. And then I read it. It was nothing short of amazing!

    In BirthWorks, my certifying organization, we spend a great deal of time talking about “pelvic bodywork,” which is something that few other childbirth organizations do. When I was early on in my training and attended a BW conference, there were midwives there who had never learned about the pelvis that way before. The fascinating info that Katy talks about coincides perfectly with the philosophy of concepts like the Webster chiropractic technique and others.

    And now I really want to order her pelvic excercise dvd!

    P.S. You beat me writing a post about this! Right after reading it, I knew I HAD to write about it. (Still haven’t though!!)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: